Solid Waste Management (SWM)

Node Page: 
Solid Waste Management
The Korean government introduced its Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) system in 2000 that strengthened producers responsibility from the production stage up to collection and recycling. EPR system is applied to four packaging materials (paper packaging, glass bottles, metal cans, and plastic packaging), lubricants, tires, fluorescent light bulbs, batteries and electronic products.
 
Share this
Municipal solid waste (MSW) management system is one of the key components of a country's overall environmental and resource efficiency framework. Inefficient MSW treatment in Russia today is causing negative environmental impact, and results in suboptimal use of raw materials and energy. If Russia optimized its MSW management policy and implemented modern technologies, by 2025 it could fully shift towards environmentally friendly MSW management system and recover up to 45% of waste.
Share this
Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) launched by Government of India has been the cornerstone of a decentralized, incentive based approach to achieve rural sanitation objectives. The scheme has developed strategic components to ensure coverage of sanitation facilities through financial and programmatic support for households, and for institutional and community sanitation. Construction of toilets needs to be complemented with mechanisms of waste handling to ensure a safe and hygienic environment in the rural areas.
Share this
The social issues involved in solid waste management (SWM) projects are oftentimes complex and city specific; solutions require a solid understanding of technical, social and cultural issues. Understanding the social dimensions of a solid waste project is a crucial element of the long-term sustainability of the project.
Share this
With rapid urbanization, population growth, and new economic activity, municipal solid waste is increasing at alarming rates, and is expected to almost triple in low and lower middle income countries by 2025. At the same time, solid waste management (SWM) systems in most developing countries are underfunded and suffer from a lack of planning. Improving SWM requires intervention all along the supply chain. Such improvements do not necessarily require major financial investment.
Share this
Over half the world’s population cooks primarily with wood, charcoal, coal, crop waste, or dung. This share is currently increasing or stagnant in most regions. Dependence on solid fuels is one of the world’s major public health challenges, causing more premature deaths than HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis combined. The use of solid fuels and stoves also imposes significant economic costs on societies that can least afford them and contributes to adverse environmental and climate change effects.
Share this
The global sanitation workforce bridges the gap between sanitation infrastructure and the provision of sanitation services. Sanitation workers provide an essential public service but often at the cost of their dignity, safety, health, and living conditions. They are some of the most vulnerable workers. They are far too often invisible, unquantified, and ostracized, and many of the challenges they face stem from this fundamental lack of acknowledgment.
Share this
This report Strategic assessment of solid waste management services and systems in Nepal is prepared by the World Bank Team in consultations with various Government agencies and Development Partners. These stakeholders had provided rich and detailed input throughout the process, prioritized the selection of study areas, and provided guidance on the initial and final findings and recommendations of the report.

 

Share this
The global sanitation workforce bridges the gap between sanitation infrastructure and the provision of sanitation services. Sanitation workers provide an essential public service but often at the cost of their dignity, safety, health, and living conditions. They are some of the most vulnerable workers. They are far too often invisible, unquantified, and ostracized, and many of the challenges they face stem from this fundamental lack of acknowledgment.
Share this
The West African coastline is home to major industries, mining activities, peri-urban and agro-industry, and tourism, as well as urban and seaside residences, all of which generate waste and cause pollution. Many areas along the coast also lack adequate wastewater and solid waste management systems. As a result, large volumes of untreated wastewater and solid waste are dumped into the open, polluting the land and water
 
Share this