Biodiversity

The Lagos Resilience Strategy is the State’s first urban resilience strategy document and it articulates an integrated approach to addressing the shocks and stresses the city experiences or might experience. Through this strategy, Lagos is committed to building a city that is efficient, innovative and inclusive. It presents a platform for planning for and tackling acute shocks and chronic stresses, thereby enabling the city to survive, adapt and grow in spite of its multifaceted challenges.
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This is a policy brief with recommendations for national governments to accelerate urban efforts to help them achieve the Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF) 2030 Action Targets. This report is a response to the call from the Plan of Action on Subnational Governments, Cities and Local Authorities for Biodiversity for a whole-of-government approach to be adopted. Local governments are key players that can engage with and contribute to the implementation of the 2030 Action Targets.
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Biodiversity underpins urban ecosystem functions that are essential for human health and well-being. Understanding how biodiversity relates to human health is a developing frontier for science, policy and practice. This article describes the beneficial, as well as harmful, aspects of biodiversity to human health in urban environments. Recent research shows that contact with biodiversity of natural environments within towns and cities can be both positive and negative to human physical, mental and social health and well-being.
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Cities are increasingly recognizing the role of the natural environment in shaping healthy and livable places that enhance human capital. With urban populations expected to grow by 2.4 billion people by 2050, innovative policies that protect and enhance the value of the environment are required to avoid substantial losses in natural habitat and create favorable places to live. Many city governments are now taking the lead in developing innovative policies to pursue green urban development.
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Biodiversity in Los Angeles is truly unique. On one hand, LA includes the highest population density of all major U.S. cities according to the 2010 U.S. Census, and is known to be one of the most “park poor” cities in the country1, 2. On the other hand, LA falls within a “Global Biodiversity Hotspot” and the City includes an exemplary range of biodiversity and large natural areas. This study documents approximately 1,200 different native species recorded within the City, and perhaps more than double that are present, but unrecorded.
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This 2021 Report Card on Ecosystem Health provides an in-depth look at the region’s efforts in moving toward a more resilient environment and community for people and native wildlife. A healthy and improved ecosystem requires protecting and restoring high-quality habitats and native biodiversity; reducing ecosystem threats like wildfire and invasive species; and ensuring every Angeleno has access to nature and its benefits such as clean water, shade, and respite through policy solutions that address the region’s inequities.
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One important way for urban leaders to rise to today’s challenges is to bring biodiversity and nature into urban design through urban ecological planning. Such planning recognizes that cities depend on biodiversity and that biodiversity depends on cities. Ecological planning not only illuminates the linkages between urbanization and biodiversity, but also helps integrate this understanding into urban planning, strategy, and investment.
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The City Academy was co-organized by the GPSC Resource Team, the consortium made up of C40, ICLEI and WRI. This academy had the following objectives for participants:
 
 
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National, regional and local governments around the world are taking steps to tackle climate change. In order to do so they need to track and report their climate data. However, in some instances, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are hard to accurately track and/or quantify.
 
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